How to Make Hibiscus Tea with Milk

Milk tea simply means a cup of tea with milk. Traditionally, robust and hearty back tea is used to make a milk tea, however, any type of tea or milk can be used. Many herbal teas (or tisanes) are strong enough to be taken with milk tea. Hibiscus flowers are an ideal herb to use with milk.

Here’s how to make a fantastically pretty and fabulously tasty hibiscus tea latte, aka hibiscus milk tea…

Read more: What is Milk Tea ? + How to Make it!

How to Make Hibiscus Tea with Milk

Made with fresh hibiscus flowers, sweet floral honey and warming spices


The flavour of hibiscus flowers is less floral and more tart tasting than you would expect. The taste is similar to that of cranberry juice. I like to add a drizzle of honey in my hibiscus tea to off-set some of the tanginess. Hibiscus is a warming drink and goes incredibly well with spices such as ginger and cinnamon.

Can Hibiscus be Taken with Milk?

Yes! Surprisingly, many herbal teas can be taken with milk. These include hibiscus, chamomile, rooibos, butterfly pea flower and even peppermint can be enjoyed with a splash of milk. Almost all tea can be taken with milk depending on your own preferences. The darker, richer and more robust teas generally taste better with milk compared to lighter and more delicate teas.

Read more: Is it ok to add Milk to Green Tea?

How to Make a Tea Latte

Making a tea latte at home is super easy to do and you don’t necessarily need any special equipment. There are various ways to make your milk a little frothy such as using a mini hand held milk frother or a milk steamer. Alternatively, you can shake your tea vigorously in a mason jar and warm it in the microwave to stabilise the bubbles.

Read more: How to Make a Tea Latte

What are the Health Benefits of Hibiscus

Hibiscus has been used for centuries by many different cultures for it’s health boosting benefits, including wonderful antioxidants, anti bacterial properties and anti inflammatory properties too. There are some reported side effects of hibiscus tea which include nausea, headache and affecting allergy sufferers too.

Read more: The Health Benefits and Risks of Hibiscus

My Tips for Making Hibiscus Milk Tea

  • The colour of hibiscus tea is reddy-purplish. The colour will only change to a bright pink colour when something acidic is added such as lemon juice. I wouldn’t recommend using lemon juice in this recipe as it will curdle the milk. If you are after a pretty pink milk-free hibiscus recipe, try this hibiscus flower tea with honey, ginger and lemon.

  • You can use any type of milk that takes your fancy such as regular, oat, almond or soy. Read more: What is the best non dairy milk to take with tea?

  • I like to use warming spices in my hibiscus tea as I think the flavours work perfectly together, however feel free to leave out the ginger and cinnamon if that’s your preference.

  • You can use any sweetener of choice, I personally like to use honey as I think that honey, especially wild flower honey, adds a beautiful delicate floral sweetness to the tart hibiscus.

  • To make an iced hibiscus latte, you can either leave your brewed hibiscus tea in the fridge to cool down before topping up with cold milk. Or if you are in a hurry, make a stronger tea by brewing the petals in less water and pouring over a large glass of ice and then topping up with milk.

  • If you decide to make an iced latte, I would recommend sweetening with simple syrup or adding your sweetener of choice when your tea is hot so that your honey/agave dissolves properly.

  • I love adding a dollop of whipped cream to my tea lattes for extra indulgence. If you are dairy free, here is a great coconut whipped cream recipe to add to all of your favourite tea lattes.

How to Make Hibiscus Tea with Milk

INGREDIENTS (Serves 2)

  • 4 Fresh hibiscus flowers (or 2 teaspoons of dried hibiscus)

  • 1 Cup of milk ( regular, oat, soy etc…)

  • 1 Inch piece of fresh ginger

  • 1 Cinnamon stick

  • 2-4 Teaspoons of sweetener (honey, agave, maple syrup)

  • Whipped cream - optional

  • Dusting of cinnamon - optional

METHOD

  • Firstly, prepare your flowers by removing the leaves, stems and the pollen part too. Wash the remaining petals to remove any pollen and stray bugs.

  • Add 1 cup (8fl oz) of freshly boiled water to a tea pot, French press or glass jug with a plate to cover the top. It’s best to cover your steeping tea to lock in all of those aromatic flavours and oils.

  • Add your ginger, cinnamon and hibiscus petals. Cover and allow to infuse for around 15 minutes.

  • Strain out the tea and pour into two cups or mugs. Add your sweetener of choice and stir to dissolve.

  • Heat your milk on the stove or in the microwave and add latte like bubbles with a hand held milk frother or milk steamer. Alternatively, shake vigorously in a mason jar to create some frothiness.

  • Top up your tea with hot milk, add a dollop of whipped cream and a dusting of cinnamon.

Read more of my Tea Time Recipes

How to Make Hibiscus Tea with Milk

How to Make Hibiscus Tea with Milk

Yield: 2
Author: Cindy Jarvis
Prep time: 15 MinTotal time: 15 Min
Made with fresh hibiscus flowers, sweet floral honey and warming ginger and cinnamon…

Ingredients

  • 4 Fresh hibiscus flowers (or 2 teaspoons of dried hibiscus)
  • 1 Cup of milk (regular, oat, soy etc…)
  • 1 Inch piece of fresh ginger - sliced or grated
  • 1 Cinnamon stick - broken in half
  • Sweetener (honey, agave, maple syrup etc...)

Instructions

  1. Firstly, prepare your flowers by removing the leaves, stems and the pollen part and wash the petals.
  2. Add 1 cup of freshly boiled water to a tea pot, add your ginger, cinnamon and hibiscus petals and allow to infuse for 15 minutes.
  3. Strain out the tea and pour into cups or mugs. Stir in your sweetener of choice.
  4. Heat your milk and add latte like bubbles with a hand held milk frother or milk steamer.
  5. Top up your tea with the hot milk, add a dollop of whipped cream and a dusting of cinnamon.

Approx nutritional values.

hibiscus tea, flower tea, tisane, milk tea, tea latte
beverages, drinks
Caribbean, American, Asian

This blog is for information purposes only. It is not intended to treat, cure or diagnose any medical conditions. Always seek advice from your healthcare provider.